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We are but one week away from May 1, a very special day in the love calendar for it is the start of the maying season. Young ladies will dance around the maypole and morris dancers will dance with bells on their clothing, silly hats and they will strike sticks with one another. Essentially, May Day the beginning of the Pentecost (Whitsun) dignifies the rutting and rambling of the Stags as they vie for the attentions of seraglios of Does. The sticks represent antlers and the Maypole manifests the male (work it out...)

In 1886 May 1 was chosen as International Workers Day by Communists, Trade Unionists and Socialists due to the Haymarket fair which took place in Chicago, but May Day and the Pentacost are rooted far back in the mists of Germanic history.

Things to do on May 1...

Make a May Day flower crown
Give a May Day flower basket
Plant some spring flowers
Dance around a Maypole
Enjoy a May Day picnic
Build a May Day bonfire
Do a May Day dance
Share Scrumpy with your significant other
Romance your partner (a-maying)


Happy a-maying, everyone!
Great post Cerb... tks for sharing this with us :)
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The Month of May

May is the fifth month of the year, has 31 days, and is named after the Greek goddess Maia.

A patch of Lily-of-the-valley, May's birth flower.
May's birth flower is Lily of the Valley.

May is the fifth month of the year in our modern day Gregorian calendar.

Naming May - Maia’s Month
May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar and its predecessor, the Julian calendar. It is named after the Greek goddess, Maia who is also identified with the Roman goddess of fertility, Bona Dea.

Old English - Maius
Latin name - Maius mensis - Month of Maia
Old French - Mai

History of May

May was originally the third month of the year in older versions of the Roman calendar and consisted of 31 days. It became the fifth month when the months January and February were added to the calendar.

Fifth Month in the Year

May is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendar and consists of 31 days. It is commonly associated as a month of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn (fall) in the Southern hemisphere. It is said that this is the month when plants really start to grow.

May does not start or end on the same day of the week as any other month.

Birth Flower and Stone

Its birth flower is the Lily of the Valley and the Crataegus monogyna.

The birthstone for May is the emerald which represents love or success.

https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/months/may.html
daisyjane wrote: Image
The Month of May

May is the fifth month of the year, has 31 days, and is named after the Greek goddess Maia.

A patch of Lily-of-the-valley, May's birth flower.
May's birth flower is Lily of the Valley.

May is the fifth month of the year in our modern day Gregorian calendar.

Naming May - Maia’s Month
May is the fifth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar and its predecessor, the Julian calendar. It is named after the Greek goddess, Maia who is also identified with the Roman goddess of fertility, Bona Dea.

Old English - Maius
Latin name - Maius mensis - Month of Maia
Old French - Mai

History of May

May was originally the third month of the year in older versions of the Roman calendar and consisted of 31 days. It became the fifth month when the months January and February were added to the calendar.

Fifth Month in the Year

May is the fifth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendar and consists of 31 days. It is commonly associated as a month of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and autumn (fall) in the Southern hemisphere. It is said that this is the month when plants really start to grow.

May does not start or end on the same day of the week as any other month.

Birth Flower and Stone

Its birth flower is the Lily of the Valley and the Crataegus monogyna.

The birthstone for May is the emerald which represents love or success.

https://www.timeanddate.com/calendar/months/may.html


Another excellent post, Daisy! :D