Carla, what is evaporated milk?  Is it that sweet think milk?  Or maybe canned milk?
Thanks Wanda for your family recipe.  I am going to try that too.  It sounds easy......and yours too Daisy is easy. The fall is here and this is the time to learn this crock pot cooking....

What a lot of great recipes ladies.  Thank you all for your contributions, you girls are the greatest!!! 
Evaporated milk usually comes in a can, very thick milk, my dad use to use it as a cream for his coffee.
I had this crock-pot meal as a kid. My Uncle took me hunting for the first time, joined by my two cousins, all three being seasoned hunters. Up to then all I had ever used a firearm for was target shooting and busting clay pigeons with my Dad. Before we left the house for the woods my Uncle took the time to explain to me that hunting was not for "fun" or to just go about killing annoying things (relax, you're safe, star LOL) - but rather a skill to be used out of necessity, whether it be food, clothing or whatever - as long as all parts were used... and respected.

He told me that we were going hunting for squirrel, as they were abundant on his property and "tasty" ...a few hours later I spotted one in a tree, nibbling on some kind of nut or seed carefully held between it's tiny front paws. So I quietly lined up my sights, braced for the kickback, squoze the trigger and fired.

I got him right in the ass.

He fell from his branch with his two little paws still locked around that nut or seed no longer needed to provide sustenance to either himself or his squirrel-family.

He lay there, maybe 20 feet away, alive, bleeding and missing one rear leg. His mouth was as wide open as a squirrel's mouth could be, gasping for air like a fish out of water.

My uncle and I looked at each other as if we were aliens from other planets attempting to communicate for the first time. I turned to look at my squirrel and my uncle explained that I needed to end his misery. The suffering had to end. It was the right thing to do... and while tears began to form as a reaction to what I had just done, I raised the rifle. It was real-life in slow-motion, the gentle movement of leaves sounding like a thousand rattler snakes, the colors of Mother Nature never so vivid. I could smell the universe spin around me.


The squirrel looked at me. I mean, really LOOKED at me, silently pleading to end the pain. And spoke to me... it was OK to have done what I just did and he forgave me. It understood it was a teaching lesson and as long as it didn't go to waste, it was "all good". Sometimes I wonder why the "human" race can't do the same for each other without repercussion when the quality of life has gone..

I stood over the squirrel, looking into it's tiny black eyes that, if human, would have been filled with tears of pain and agony, begging me to please end it.

The second shot hit it's target and the pain was gone.

And we all walked back to the house, silent and lost in our own thoughts and worlds. And after we arrived I was taught, while still in a spinning, dizzying, silently screaming Salvador Dalí-like world, how to gut and dress. I learned the horrific procedures as my prize's entire being was stretched, salted, dried and made into a small, incredibly soft pelt. The organs were fed to the dogs and the meat placed into a stew pot.

I now knew the true value of life.

I often wonder about that squirrel's "family" and that animals have feelings, too. If they didn't there would be no survival instinct. And how odd it is that we as a species can kill for recreation or to simply cause pain to prove a point in an empty moment of vengeance. And again, we are the only species that practices vengeance and uses violence to get others to comply with our own individual ideologies. Look at how Columbus dealt with the native Indians after stumbling upon "American" soil.

And that we also are the only species on the planet that abuses free-will and often chooses to self-destruct by suicide when we selfishly decide that there is nothing to live for.

Having said all that, the stew was delicious. Years later a friend brought a dressed turkey into my shop. He had hit it just a few hours prior with his truck but it was not bruised in the edible portions. Still, it was fresh roadkill. I'll say it again... ROADKILL! And I've always sworn that I would never eat roadkill.

It was delicious. Probably the best turkey I've ever had. Another animal had given it's life to fill our bellies. And we ate every last bite in caveman-tribal-like respect, often wiping the saliva from our chins as we sliced another piece and slobbered it down while talking about our day and marinating not just in food, but companionship.

Please remember where the food on your plate came from. Hmmm... odd how I'm posting this so close to thanksgiving...

Anyways, here's the resipe for my Uncle's squirrel stew... I love crock-pot meals... it makes about four healthy-sized servings. It's also good with rabbit (in the same proportions)...

Uncle Eddie's Squirrel Stew

1 onion, cut into chunks

2 cups baby carrots (pr thick-sliced)

4 large potatoes, cut into small chunks

1 large green bell pepper, cut into chunks

2 cloves garlic

4 cubes chicken bouillon

salt and pepper to taste

3 squirrels - skinned, gutted, and cut into pieces

water to cover

2 tablespoons flour

*****************

PREP
25 mins

COOK
8 hrs

READY IN
8 hrs 25 mins

***************************

Directions

Place the onion, carrots, potatoes, bell pepper, garlic, chicken bouillon, salt, and pepper in your crock-pot. Lay the squirrel meat on top of the vegetable mixture. Pour enough water over the mixture to cover completely. Don't stir just yet. Cover and cook on HIGH 6 hours. Stir the flour into the mixture and cook about another 2 hours.

Then enjoy - it's a heart-healthy meal that's very tasty and quite filling - and like any other crock-pot recipe it's even better re-heated after a night in the fridge.

I write this on 9/11 - it strikes me odd how the pain and deaths of thousands does not always equal or trump the the pain or death of one, even a squirrel, who gave their life to ensure that others may continue their own.

Be thankful for your next meal - it may be your last. You never know...

-DF
No worries fishy, I was taught how to hunt, and I can't remember what the rifle was, but it knock the stuffing out of me, so from that point on, never went hunting again.

Now, squirrels? No problem here, they been stealing nuts from the bird feeders, but they are quick to run, and more so when the cats go out then they don't stick around for sure...

But there was a recipe for Turkey, I think the story goes, stuff the turkey with popcorn and put it in the cooker? Now what a loud bang that would be?
Italian Beef Sandwiches

If you can't find Italian rolls, substitute a sturdy bread that will soak up the juices in this moist, delightfully messy sandwich.

Cooking Light OCTOBER 2009

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1 sandwich and about 1/3 cup cooking liquid)

Ingredients

1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 (2 1/2-pound) rump roast, trimmed
1 (14-ounce) can fat-free, less-sodium beef broth
1 garlic clove, minced

2 teaspoons olive oil
1 cup coarsely chopped green bell pepper (about 1 medium)
8 (2-ounce) Italian rolls
Giardiniera (pickled vegetables), chopped (optional)

Preparation

1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large zip-top bag, and marinate in the refrigerator overnight.

2. Place beef and marinade in an electric slow cooker; cook on LOW 8 hours or until beef is tender. Place beef on a cutting board (reserve cooking liquid); let stand 10 minutes. Thinly slice beef; place in a shallow dish. Pour cooking liquid over beef.

3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add bell pepper to pan; sauté 5 minutes or until tender. Slice rolls lengthwise, cutting to, but not through, other side. Hollow out top and bottom halves of rolls, leaving a 3/4-inch-thick shell; reserve the torn bread for another use. Arrange about 3 ounces beef and 2 tablespoons bell peppers on each roll. Drizzle 1 tablespoon cooking liquid over beef and peppers; top with giardiniera, if desired. Serve with remaining 2 1/2 cups cooking liquid for dipping.
DaddyFish wrote:
I now knew the true value of life.

I often wonder about that squirrel's "family" and that animals have feelings, too. If they didn't there would be no survival instinct. And how odd it is that we as a species can kill for recreation or to simply cause pain to prove a point in an empty moment of vengeance. And again, we are the only species that practices vengeance and uses violence to get others to comply with our own individual ideologies. Look at how Columbus dealt with the native Indians after stumbling upon "America"


DaddyFish, 

Your story reminded me of MacHaelle Small Wright's book: "Behaving As If the God In All Life Mattered"----(MacHaelle Small Wright also started the Perelandra Gardens in Va--very interesting and enlightening.)  

Don't think I'm gonna' be cooking crockpot squirrel--:)

Wanda
SOUR CREAM CHIECKEN


Ingredients:




Servings:
4

SOUR CREAM CHCKEN

.1 (3 1/2 lb) package boneless skinless chicken breasts
3 teaspoonssalt
3/4 teaspoonpepper
3/4 teaspoonpaprika
1 cupdry white wine
1 (26 ounce) can condensed cream of chicken soup
2 cupssour cream


Directions:

1

Mix salt,pepper, and paprika in small bowl and rub over each piece of chicken and place in crock pot.


2

Mix wine and chicken soup together and pour over chicken.


3

Cook on low for 6-8 hours or high for 2-3.


4

Remove chicken from crock pot and place on plate. Stir sour cream into sauce mixture in crock pot. Return chicken to pot for about 5-10 minutes longer to heat through.


5

*Serve over white rice.
Here is one my family loves!

Crock Pot Teriyaki Pork Tenderloin

2T olive oil
2lbs pork tenderloin
1/2 cup teriyaki sauce
1 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup brown sugar
4 cloves chopped garlic
1/2 large onion
1/4 tsp pepper

Heat olive oil in a skillet on medium heat, brown tenderloin. Mix teriyaki sauce, chicken broth and brown sugar. Add garlic, onions, and black pepper. Put browned meat in pot, cover with sauce mixture. Cook on high for 4 hours. Turn 2 to 3 times while cooking. Remove meat and let rest for 5 minutes.
Both of these recipes look so-o-o good --Katmommie and Blueyes.  I'm cutting and pasting to my recipe file to try real soon.  Thanks for sharing, Wanda
I have to agree with Wanda, it look good and I too going to save that recipe to my files.
griffith7x57 wrote: Italian Beef Sandwiches

If you can't find Italian rolls, substitute a sturdy bread that will soak up the juices in this moist, delightfully messy sandwich.

Cooking Light OCTOBER 2009

Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1 sandwich and about 1/3 cup cooking liquid)

Ingredients

1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 (2 1/2-pound) rump roast, trimmed
1 (14-ounce) can fat-free, less-sodium beef broth
1 garlic clove, minced

2 teaspoons olive oil
1 cup coarsely chopped green bell pepper (about 1 medium)
8 (2-ounce) Italian rolls
Giardiniera (pickled vegetables), chopped (optional)

Preparation

1. Combine first 5 ingredients in a large zip-top bag, and marinate in the refrigerator overnight.

2. Place beef and marinade in an electric slow cooker; cook on LOW 8 hours or until beef is tender. Place beef on a cutting board (reserve cooking liquid); let stand 10 minutes. Thinly slice beef; place in a shallow dish. Pour cooking liquid over beef.

3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add bell pepper to pan; sauté 5 minutes or until tender. Slice rolls lengthwise, cutting to, but not through, other side. Hollow out top and bottom halves of rolls, leaving a 3/4-inch-thick shell; reserve the torn bread for another use. Arrange about 3 ounces beef and 2 tablespoons bell peppers on each roll. Drizzle 1 tablespoon cooking liquid over beef and peppers; top with giardiniera, if desired. Serve with remaining 2 1/2 cups cooking liquid for dipping.


This sound good too, I got most of the ingredients so I will try making those... Who ever invented slow cooker sure was brilliant! The summer or hot day are coming to an end so doing them in skillet would be ok on a cooler or cold days.
I just bought my first Crock Pot/Slow Cooker yesterday so these recipes will come in handy. My daughter swears by them, but I'm really old fashioned and have always cooked by stove or over :oops:
Here's a slow cooker recipe for New Years.


Slow Cooker Hoppin' John

This slow cooker hoppin' john recipe is perfect for New Year's Day celebrations.

All You MAY 2010

Yield: Serves 6
Cook time: 5 Hours, 30 Minutes
Prep time: 5 Minutes
Cost Per Serving:$1.21

Ingredients

4 strips thick-cut bacon, diced
1 small onion
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
1 cup dried black-eyed peas, rinsed and picked over

1 15-oz. can diced tomatoes, drained
1 1/2 cups long-grain rice
1 teaspoon salt

Preparation

1. Place bacon in a saucepan and cook over medium heat until just beginning to crisp. Add onion and cook, stirring, until softened, about 5 minutes. Scrape bacon, bacon fat and onion into slow cooker. Add crushed red pepper, peas and 4 cups water and stir to combine. Cover and cook on low until peas are nearly tender, 3 to 4 hours.

2. Stir in tomatoes, rice and salt. Cover and continue to cook just until rice is tender and has absorbed all liquid, 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Fluff with a fork and serve.
Note:

Go whole grain. Swap in brown rice instead of white to add fiber and other nutrients to this already healthful dish.
Turn up the heat. Like a kick? Use more crushed red pepper and sprinkle the dish with hot sauce just before serving (or pass the sauce at the table).
Jessy wrote: Does anyone have any "tried and true" crock pot recipes?  I have a crock pot and I have never used it, so I think it is about time.  


Don't recover the lid, if, you remove add 20 min to your cooking time