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“There is little that irks British defenders of the English language more than Americanisms, which they see creeping insidiously into newspaper columns and everyday conversation. But bit by bit British English is invading America too.” Quote from BBC.

So we all think that we speak English, but what is English, do we even know anymore? How can we have UK English, US English, Australian English etc. surely English is English? It would seem that it is not. Would it not be more accurate to describe it as English with Americanisms and so on?

A few years ago, I learned that in some countries, English students are now taught US English, they then come here and cannot understand why lots of words are spelled differently! Is it me or would you expect someone learning a new language to learn the original?

Mostly we understand each other perfectly, whichever version we use. However, this week a fellow member and I discovered that what he calls a sweepstake, I would call a competition. Other notable differences include:
Fanny - In UK, usually a woman’s name or intimate part of a woman’s anatomy. In US a different part of anyone’s anatomy!
Car Boot in UK – trunk in US
Car Bonnet in UK – hood in US
Pavement in UK – sidewalk in US
Autumn in UK – fall in US
Hair fringe in UK – bangs in US (took me years to figure that one out!)
Pants in UK, trousers. In US underwear.
Biscuit -in UK hard, baked, sweet or savoury. In US a kind of bread (possibly what we would call a type of scone?)

That takes the biscuit! – in UK, something really bad, annoying or objectionable.

Can you add more? What stumped YOU?
What irks you most?

I think one thing which irks me very much is being called a Brit. I am English or British!

If English is not your first language, which version did you learn?

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There's a few words I've heard in movies and wondered exactly what they mean:

Git
Plonker
Fat Prat
Blighty: I take it this is slang for Great Britain but only the British are allowed to say it, it's offensive coming from foreigners.

Hold on to your breakfast because we use napkins to wipe our mouths after we eat.
We call nappies diapers.
And a biscuit is closer to an English muffin than a scone.
We call Chips Fries, and Crisps Crackers. Our "Chips" are a myriad of all shapes and ingredient flavors made from potatoes, corn, and kale.

From chatting with people in Australia I picked up No Worries, Good On You, and [you] Richard. What they call getting booked, we call getting a ticket, booking to us is getting processed after being arrested, the mug shot and fingerprinting.
Ta A lar Bearla agum, (Irish for, I have a lot of English)
I can speak 7 diff languages, BS is my fav. 
:D  I do but even within the U.S. there are difference phases with different meanings, like Jeet? = Did you eat?? No, jew = No, you... Mayonaise = mayonaise a lotto peeps on this site... Observed in a Texas motel.... Guy:OK Padro.. what is the phrase?? Pedro: "Chicken Wings".. Guy:... Chicken wings.. use that in a sentence.. Pedro: My Mamacita buy lottery tick so chicken wings monies"  :lol:
Joceannora wrote: There's a few words I've heard in movies and wondered exactly what they mean:

Git
Plonker
Fat Prat
Blighty: I take it this is slang for Great Britain but only the British are allowed to say it, it's offensive coming from foreigners.

Hold on to your breakfast because we use napkins to wipe our mouths after we eat.
We call nappies diapers.
And a biscuit is closer to an English muffin than a scone.
We call Chips Fries, and Crisps Crackers. Our "Chips" are a myriad of all shapes and ingredient flavors made from potatoes, corn, and kale.

From chatting with people in Australia I picked up No Worries, Good On You, and [you] Richard. What they call getting booked, we call getting a ticket, booking to us is getting processed after being arrested, the mug shot and fingerprinting.


Joce, translations


git (ɡɪt Pronunciation for git )


Definitions


noun
(British, slang) 1.a contemptible person, often a fool
2.a bastard


Word Origin
C20: from get (in the sense: to beget, hence a bastard, fool)

Example Sentences Including 'git'



Although my mum was in her seventies, I could see how she might catch the eye of some randy old git.
Tony Parsons MAN AND WIFE (2002)

And the kid will think --- stupid old git , that Uncle Harry.
Tony Parsons MAN AND WIFE (2002)

Look you tight git , I said, I know more about Coll's personal details than anyone on this earth.
Kate Cann GO! (2001)

Plonker, similar but more jokey.
Prat - stupid idiot, ergo, fat prat - stupid fat idiot
Never heard of blighty been offensive from others but it is generally taken to mean home. E.g. back to blighty.
Getting a ticket to us is usually parking or speeding fine.
We also say Good on you and No worries.
We say napkins, but also serviettes.
You say candy, we say sweets. Chocolate is a different category.
You may say bye, we say ta ta, often pronounced tah rah or tra
Another  US word I have learned fairly recently is berm,  we say hard shoulder!
Supprisingly enuf Gwn, its also a scottish word,
If they have been out in the sun too long,
They say i got sunberm, hahahhahahahj


Where do i get this stuff from. 
I purchased a 6 pack of beer and there was no one around to help drink it,, so I had to drink it Obama self.. Si,, Lou