There is a tenuous link in that the English Defence League which is based on the fascist islamaphobic ideology of the National Front uses the St Georges flag in its promotions and demonstrations. I don't think this should be allowed as it taints the flag for some and gives outsiders the impression that their beliefs are common in England rather than just the extremist minority that it is.
dodgerw wrote: Thank you Sara

Just shows as there is absolutely no response - I know the room is world wide but I thought English ??? but sadly no.


Canada wasn't a country then, so we don't celebrate it. But I see later on in your post, you said England.
However, Canada does celebrate Queen Victoria birthday.

Queen Victoria

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Victoria

Alberta, Canada. This province where I live .... was named after Queen Victoria's fourth daughter, Princess Louise Caroline Alberta. Alberta was originally established as a provisional district of the North West Territories in 1882. The name was maintained when Alberta officially became a province in 1905.

https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/earth-sciences/geography/place-names/origins-geographical-names/9224

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_A._Macdonald

https://globalnews.ca/news/2714339/why-we-still-celebrate-queen-victorias-birthday/

Canada at one time... rule under United Kingdom for many years until Pierre E. Trudeau (Justin Trudeau’s Father).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Trudeau

Patriation of the constitution

Trudeau had attempted patriation of the constitution earlier in his tenure, most notably with the Victoria Charter, but ran into the combined force of provincial premiers on the issues of an amending formula, a court-enforced Charter of Rights, and a further devolution of powers to the provinces. After the victory in the Quebec referendum, Chrétien was immediately tasked with creating a constitutional settlement.
After chairing a series of increasingly acrimonious conferences with first ministers on the issue, Trudeau announced the intention of the federal government to proceed with a request to the British parliament to patriate the constitution, with additions to be approved by a referendum without input from provincial governments. Trudeau was backed by the NDP, Ontario Premier Bill Davis, and New Brunswick Premier Richard Hatfield and was opposed by the remaining premiers and PC leader Joe Clark. After numerous provincial governments challenged the legality of the decision using their reference power, conflicting decisions prompted a Supreme Court decision that stated unilateral patriation was legal, but was in contravention of a constitutional convention that the provinces be consulted and have general agreement to the changes.
After the court decision, which prompted some reservations in the British parliament of accepting a unilateral request,[82] Trudeau agreed to meet with the premiers one more time before proceeding. At the meeting, Trudeau reached an agreement with nine of the premiers on patriating the constitution and implementing the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, with the caveat that provincial legislatures would have the ability to use a notwithstanding clause to protect some laws from judicial oversight. The notable exception was Lévesque, who, Trudeau believed, would never have signed an agreement. The objection of the Quebec government to the new constitution became a source of continued acrimony between the federal and Quebec governments, and would forever stain Trudeau's reputation amongst nationalists in the province.
The Canada Act, which included the Constitution Act, 1982 and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, was proclaimed by Queen Elizabeth II, as Queen of Canada, on April 17, 1982
.
https://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/eppp-archive/100/200/301/ic/can_digital_collections/pasttopresent/settlement/415_Victoria_Day.html

So all in all Dod… This is why Canada celebrate a special person’s birthday or similar. Where as Saint George isn’t in Canada as he didn’t do anything for Canada, we were not a country then. (Canada being one of the newest countries in the world. Even USA is older than Canada). I hope this clear it all up for you Dod?
:)
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Sorry Dodger, under no offense not everyone has a Christian faith. “Saint George” not everyone is Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican, Luthern or Umbanda, so it mean nothing to them. But it doesn't mean that you don't stop celebrating. :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_George

I don’t go to church due to my hearing loss and I get lost in the service. A lot of history will get lost if it not remembered by…. I for one forgot about it because I don’t go to any of the above churches. If it wasn’t for you or Sara, it will never be remembered by me. Since Sara mention that it was moved to St. Paddy Day, that is when I recalled it, otherwise, I wouldn’t remember it.

At one time, we had a calendar that will mention the special day in history of someone, don’t have that anymore, I think it is because of Cellphones with Calender's and time. Who wear a wrist watch these days? Not many.

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Thank gosh for beer,,,,,,lololol
Graham1 wrote: There is a tenuous link in that the English Defence League which is based on the fascist islamaphobic ideology of the National Front uses the St Georges flag in its promotions and demonstrations. I don't think this should be allowed as it taints the flag for some and gives outsiders the impression that their beliefs are common in England rather than just the extremist minority that it is.


You utter cynic, Graham :lol:
:?:
blackwidow wrote: Thank gosh for beer,,,,,,lololol


With beer in your hand and.....
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I notice your happy thoughts always involve food and drink....hmmmm

Today's happy thought....
IT'S FRIDAY

And they're not making me work over the weekend. YAYYYYY :D
Sara2101 wrote: I notice your happy thoughts always involve food and drink....hmmmm


That's not food. It's a ploughman's platter, and Heaven on a plate.
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A ploughman's lunch is an English cold meal of bread, cheese, and onions, usually accompanied by butter and pickles. Additional items such as ham, green salad, hard boiled eggs and apple can be added. As its name suggests, it is most commonly eaten at lunchtime, is particularly associated with pubs, and often accompanied with beer or cider, usually the latter.

Beer/cider (or in earlier ages, Mead), bread, and cheese have been combined in the English diet since antiquity, and have been served together in inns for centuries. However, the specific term "ploughman's lunch" is believed to date from the 1950s, when the Cheese Bureau, a marketing body, began promoting it in pubs as a way to increase the sales of cheese, which had recently ceased to be rationed. Its popularity increased as the Milk Marketing Board promoted the meal nationally throughout the 1960s.


Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman%27s_lunch
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daisyjane wrote: Image


Right on, man! :)
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My happiest moment this weekend was peeling potatoes for dinner. It was the most enjoyable thing I've done since someone else peeled the potatoes. :lol: