Most friendships develop naturally and you don't eve remember how or why they started. Sometimes, however, you may wish to make an effort to befriend a new acquaintance or to become a better friend to someone. To help you out, here are 17 psychological strategies to get people to like you.
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1. copy them

This strategy is called "mirroring" and involves subtly mimicking their behaviour. When talking to someone, try copying their body language, gestures and facial expressions. People are wont to like someone who's behaviour is similar to their own.

2. spend more time around them

According to the mere-exposure-effect, people tend to like things they are familiar with. Talk to them, correspond with them. These interactions are likely to develop into fully fledged friendships. Spending more time with people can make them like you more.

3. Compliment other people

People will associate the adjectives you use to describe other people with your personality. This phenomenon is called spontaneous trait transference. According to Gretchen Rubin, author of books including "The Happiness Project," "whatever you say about other people influences how people see you."

If you describe someone else as genuine and kind, people will also associate you with those qualities. Your new friends will start to associate these qualities with you as well.

4. Be in a great mood

Emotional contagion describes what happens when people are strongly influenced by the moods of other people. People can unconsciously feel the emotions of those around them. If you want to make others feel happy when they're around you, do your best to communicate positive emotions.

5. Make friends with their friends

The social-network theory behind this effect is called triadic closure, which means that two people are likely to be closer when they have a common friend. To illustrate this effect, people are more likely to accept your friendship as their number of mutual friends increased.

6. Don't be complimentary all the time

The gain-loss theory of interpersonal attractiveness suggests that your positive comments will make more of an impact if you deliver them only occasionally. Ironically, people like others best when their comments vary from positive to negative, suggesting that people like to feel that they've won you over in some capacity.

Although it's counterintuitive, try complimenting your potential friends less often.

7. Be warm and competent

People tend to judge others based on their warmth and competence. If you can portray yourself as warm — i.e., noncompetitive and friendly — people will feel like they can trust you. If you seem competent — for example, if you have high economic or educational status — they're more inclined to respect you.

8. Reveal your flaws from time to time

According to the pratfall effect, people will like you more after you make a mistake — but if they only believe you are usually a competent person. Revealing that you aren't perfect makes you more relatable and vulnerable toward the people around you. Simple mistakes can affect perceived attraction.

If you tend to spill your coffee sometimes, but not too frequently, others will rate you higher on likability than if you never make even the slightest mistake.

9. Emphasize your shared values

People are more attracted to those who are similar to them. This is known as the similarity-attraction effect. If you're hoping to get friendly with someone, try to find a point of similarity between you two and highlight it.

10. Casually touch them

This is known as subliminal touching, which occurs when you touch a person so subtly that they barely notice. Common examples include tapping someone's back or touching their arm, which can make them feel more warmly toward you. If you're on a website or social network, contact them with a nudge or a smile.

For example, the effects of interpersonal touch when waitresses briefly touched customers on the hand or shoulder as they were returning their change. As it turns out, they earned significantly larger tips than waitresses who didn't touch their customers.

11. Smile

Smiling when you first meet someone or sending them a smile online helps ensure they'll remember you later.

12. See the other person how they want to be seen

People want to be perceived in a way that aligns with their own beliefs about themselves. This phenomenon is described by self-verification theory. We all seek confirmations of our views, positive or negative.

People are more likely to associate with those who have positive rather than negative impressions of them. This is because people like to interact with those who provide feedback consistent with their known identity, their relationship with them then flows more smoothly. That's important because we then feel understood, which is an important component of intimacy.

13. Tell them a secret

Self-disclosure may be one of the best relationship-building techniques. Spending time getting to know each other better is an essential tool in friendship building. Sharing information about ourselves would leave to a deeper and firmer friendship and relationship. Ask about their favourite holiday, for example.

14. Expect good things from people

According to the Pygmalion effect, people treat others in ways that are consistent with their expectations of them and therefore cause the person to behave in a way that confirms those expectations. If you expect someone to be friendly toward you, they are more likely to behave in a friendly manner toward you.

15. Act like you like them

When we think someone likes us, we tend to like them as well. This is known as reciprocity of liking. Often the people we liked best are the ones who like us.

16. Display a sense of humour

Regardless of whether we are thinking about our ideal friend or romantic partner, having a sense of humour is really important. Not having a sense of humour, especially in social situations, could backfire. People are less well-liked and less popular among others if they are dull and morally focused.

17. Let them talk about themselves

Talking about yourself may be inherently rewarding, the same way that food, money, and sex are. It is important to allow others to talk about themselves, too. Allowing someone share a story or two about their life instead of blabbing on about yours could give them more positive memories of your interaction.


source: https://www.iflscience.com/brain/17-psychological-tricks-to-make-people-like-you-immediately/
Very good Advice!

If you don't feel you can follow these advice, simple just say so, this way we will understand why, for example, my Uncle pass away and Easter wasn't a happy one.

Be understanding and I see Cerberus started a thread for those who need a friend, a shoulder to cry on so to speak. This is one reason why we are all here, don't be shy, we are here to help, this how you know who your friends are, friends are the ones that make your day much happier by taken off some of those burdens.
daisyjane wrote: Very good Advice!

If you don't feel you can follow these advice, simple just say so, this way we will understand why, for example, my Uncle pass away and Easter wasn't a happy one.

Be understanding and I see Cerberus started a thread for those who need a friend, a shoulder to cry on so to speak. This is one reason why we are all here, don't be shy, we are here to help, this how you know who your friends are, friends are the ones that make your day much happier by taken off some of those burdens.


That's right, Daisy, this site is all about friendship. I do hope that my advice will empower others to make lots of new friends :)
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