Good Evening,
I put my beloved pet to sleep today and my daughters are upset with me. Our dog was 15 years old but last 3 months she been loosing weight and could see her ribs. She was at the Vet in March of this year and gave us to give to her medicine and nothing. She has this cyst behind her ear and big cyst on her neck. The vet said if medicine did not work they would have to X-rays and then surgrery... which I felt was way to expensive and how much do you keep paying the vet to extend the life of a dog or cat etc... when you know your pet is in pain and will never get better. 15 years in dog life equals like 85 years old in people life. I did not tell my daughters to who are 25 and 23 years old because I wanted to remember her at her good time....was I wrong? They are not talking to me. I could have her be in pain for another month to year... have her die at home. It was getting to the point she would not go up stairs to 2nd floor and going outside was becoming a chore because I really had to watch going up the stairs to get back in the house. She was hacking at night and during the day and when she ate it would come back up.... all she wanted to do was drink water. Unique16
Hi Unique, welcome to the site
I think you did the right thing for your dog. I am an ex dog breeder and I know it is a bad decision to have to make.
I recently lost an old dog. In November he developed growths in and around his anus and although benign were causing him great distress. They did not respond to medication and the only other options were an expensive operation or put him to sleep. He had a heart condition but the vet was confident he could get him through it.
Well he did, though his heart worsened and he died of heart failure in February. I wish I had let him go peacefully in November.
I think you should be honest with your daughters, if they truly loved your pet, they will understand and would not have wanted her to suffer An operation is always risky, but for a 15 year old dog would have been very traumatic.
I am lucky that I still have another dog, but I miss Sunny dreadfully. He was the last of my beloved Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. Maybe it would help you to get another pet.
Take care and do not feel badly, you did the right thing. x
This may be a roundabout way of making a point but when I was 11 my grandfather died. I was home alone with him. I wasn't allowed to go to the funeral because my parents thought I was too young so I never got to say goodbye. Maybe they would have liked to have been with the dog supporting her in her final moments and letting her know how much they had loved her?

(I had my 12-year-old chihuahua put to sleep in August. His heart had tanked and his liver was enlarged. I probably could have kept him alive longer, but that would have been for me and not for him. You did the right thing in that respect.) 
I can tell this is troubling for you, you're all over the place just explaining it.

From what you said putting the dog down was the right thing to do. So is the issue for you now that you didn't tell your daughters? Do they live at home? Have they been taking care of the dog? Are they now living completely separate lives away from where you live? Are they not talking to you based on your putting the dog down, or because they have lives away from you now? Would either of your daughters have been able to shoulder the financial burden of keeping an ailing dog alive?

As the caretaker it's up to you to make the decision. You made the right one. Not telling your daughters? Tell them now and tell them why. If they ask why you didn't tell them the dog was ailing and the decision needed to be made explain to them that you were the caregiver and they wouldn't have wanted to see how badly the dog had deteriorated before you made that kind decision to end its suffering.

I'm sorry for your loss. I also had to put down the family lab, one of the saddest decisions anyone can make. Suggest to your daughters that you all get together to make a small memorial for each of you, like a photo, or collage of photos of your daughters with the dog. Give them something to remember and take advantage of the time together to reach an emotional peace about it.
You did the right thing. There comes a point in all animals (including humans) where quality of life has degraded to the point that euthanasia is a compassionate path. I'm glad you chose it - and am sad for your loss but happy that your (bestest) friend has moved on to a better place because of your love and caring.

If only we could do that as human beings...

-DF
unique16 wrote: Good Evening,
I put my beloved pet to sleep today and my daughters are upset with me. Our dog was 15 years old but last 3 months she been loosing weight and could see her ribs. She was at the Vet in March of this year and gave us to give to her medicine and nothing. She has this cyst behind her ear and big cyst on her neck. The vet said if medicine did not work they would have to X-rays and then surgrery... which I felt was way to expensive and how much do you keep paying the vet to extend the life of a dog or cat etc... when you know your pet is in pain and will never get better. 15 years in dog life equals like 85 years old in people life. I did not tell my daughters to who are 25 and 23 years old because I wanted to remember her at her good time....was I wrong? They are not talking to me. I could have her be in pain for another month to year... have her die at home. It was getting to the point she would not go up stairs to 2nd floor and going outside was becoming a chore because I really had to watch going up the stairs to get back in the house. She was hacking at night and during the day and when she ate it would come back up.... all she wanted to do was drink water. Unique16



My daughter is 22, we just put down our cat, I made her part of the decision. Yes, she needed to help make that decision, Gigi was part of her life, it did take her some time to come to terms with it, she was in the vets office, it gave her closure. As adults, who were part of the animals life, yes I feel they should be a part of the decision, give them a chance to say goodbye.

You should apologize, recognize their side, tell them why you did what you did. (my humble opinion)
Hi Unique,

I also feel that you did the right thing for your dog - but I know only too well it doesn't always feel like the right thing for us. (My son had just arrived home for a visit when his favourite dog died..... he didn't speak to me for a while - because he was so upset by seeing 'his' dog unable to stand or eat following a stroke). Your daughters are clearly missing a much loved family member but they will, in time, realise you made the best decision you could.
Like gwynnie I am an ex dog breeder, and have had to make that decision far more times than I would have liked - it never gets any easier! I'm dreading the day I have to say goodbye to my last one.

I hope your daughters soon realise that you are also grieving, and you can get through this time together. Remember your much loved pet is no longer in pain or suffering.... that is the greatest act of love and kindness.
Hello Earth, Nice to see U,
Happy Watever it is. 
Hi Earth
Nice to meet a fellow ex-breeder, is that a Keeshond in your gallery? Looks gorgeous :) I am down to my last dog now and faced with a new problem. He needs company, hates being left by himself when I go out. So do I get another one that may outlive me or not? My greatest pleasure is watching them play together, the dog I have doesn't really play with people, only other dogs. What to do? Not sure if I want to get an older one, I am broody for puppies! :(
Hi gwynnie,
I know how you feel - I am also broody for new pups, but I doubt if I would have the patience to cope with an exuberant Kees puppy these days. Instead, I look at photos of friends' pups and say "That one's mine!"
My last Keesie is now 10 years old. She's a sweetheart, but suffers from separation anxiety, exacerbated by my husband's long stay in hospital last year - she adores him and gets stressed every time he leaves the house. She can be very destructive when stressed!!!
For the time being she will be our last dog (we don't want her to teach a new one how to tear up the house), but I am hopeful that in time we will find another one to love...
scrummy wrote: Hello Earth, Nice to see U,
Happy Watever it is. 


Nice to see you too, scrummy,
xxx
Earth, I thought I had the only dog to suffer from separation anxiety. Mine isn't destructive, but he cries and whines all the time and he can keep it up for a very long time. He also yaps when he gets excited on walks and like you I don't want him to teach another to be the same. It took him 5 years to teach my last Cavalier to bark but he managed it! The things we go through for our pets. :D
Gwynnie, for 12 years I had to leave the house by climbing over the front wall, because if my not-so-brave watchdog saw or heard me open the gate he would howl until I returned (he was a big boy with a good pair of lungs). He was Jenni's father so I suppose she came by it honestly.
Jenni was a retired brood bitch who came to be a companion for the last one I ever bred, who couldn't cope with being an only dog - she used to "delegate" to Jenni, who misses her a lot (so do we) since she passed over the Rainbow Bridge.